Pamela McArdle | Duxbury Real Estate, Marshfield Real Estate, Pembroke Real Estate


You don't need to be a home selling expert to counter a buyer's offer to purchase your house. In fact, sellers who know what factors to consider as they evaluate a homebuying proposal may be better equipped than others to submit a successful counter-offer.

Now, let's take a look at three factors a seller should consider before countering a buyer's offer to purchase his or her home.

1. Your Home Selling Goals

If an initial offer to purchase your home falls shy of your property selling expectations, there is no need to stress. By countering this proposal, you and a buyer may be able to find common ground. And as a result, both parties may be able to come to an agreement on a house sale.

Analyze your home selling goals closely. And if you find a buyer's offer to purchase comes close to helping you achieve your goals, you may want to submit a counter-proposal.

2. Your Home's Condition

The condition of your home may have far-flung effects on your house selling experience. If your home is in need of assorted upgrades, a buyer may be more inclined than ever before to account for these repairs in his or her offer to purchase. Meanwhile, as a home seller, you need to consider your residence's condition as you assess an offer to purchase and proceed accordingly.

If you feel a buyer's initial offer to purchase your home is low based on your residence's condition, you may want to counter the proposal. However, if you account for the costs of potential home repairs in your counter-proposal, you may be able to come to terms with a buyer on a home selling agreement.

3. Your Home's Price

Although you may have allocated significant time and resources to price your home appropriately based on the current real estate market's conditions, you may receive an offer to purchase that falls short of your expectations. Fortunately, if you submit a counter-proposal, you can make it clear about what price you are willing to accept for your residence. And if you provide a counter-offer to an initial homebuying proposal, you can show a buyer exactly how much he or she will need to pay to purchase your house.

As you analyze an offer to purchase your home, keep in mind that you can always collaborate with a real estate agent too. If you work with a real estate agent, you may be able to gain the insights you need to make an informed property selling decision.

Typically, a real estate agent can help you weigh the pros and cons of accepting, rejecting or countering an offer to purchase your house. If you are looking for in-depth home selling recommendations and suggestions, a real estate agent is happy to provide them to you at your convenience.

Assess an offer to purchase your home carefully – you'll be glad you did. If you feel you may be able to reach an agreement with a buyer, you may want to counter his or her homebuying proposal.


In some instances, it may be beneficial to reject an offer to purchase your home. Because if a homebuying proposal fails to meet your expectations, you may want to wait for another offer to come your way.

Reviewing a homebuying proposal and determining whether to reject this offer can be tricky. But we're here to help you evaluate an offer to purchase so you can decide the best course of action and feel confident about your choice.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you assess an offer to purchase and determine whether to decline.

1. Review the Local Housing Market

The housing market in your city or town is a major factor in the property selling journey. If you're selling your residence in a buyer's market, you likely face steep competition to sell your house and maximize its value. Comparatively, if you're operating in a seller's market, there may be an abundance of buyers and a shortage of sellers in place.

Take a look at the prices of recently sold residences and how long these properties were listed before they sold. You may want to consider the prices of currently available houses in your area that are similar to your residence too. With this housing market data in hand, you can differentiate a buyer's market from a seller's one and take a data-driven approach to decide how to proceed with an offer to purchase.

2. Weigh Your Home's Strengths and Weaknesses

You believe your home is great, but you also realize that your residence is far from perfect. As such, it often helps to weigh your residence's strengths and weaknesses relative to an offer to purchase and proceed accordingly.

For example, if a homebuyer submits a competitive offer to purchase your home in spite of its exterior damage, you may want to accept this proposal. On the other hand, if a buyer submits a "lowball" offer on your recently upgraded house, you may want to decline this proposal.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

If you're unsure about whether to reject an offer to purchase, there is no need to worry. You can always hire a real estate agent, and this housing market professional can provide comprehensive support throughout the property selling journey.

A real estate agent is ready to help you in any way possible. If you need help listing your residence and promoting it to prospective buyers, a real estate agent can assist you. Or, if you want to find innovative ways to enhance your residence's curb appeal, a real estate agent can provide home exterior upgrade recommendations.

Of course, a real estate agent will work with you to review any offer to purchase your house. You and your real estate agent together can discuss the pros and cons of a homebuying proposal and make a decision that corresponds to your house selling goals.

Take the guesswork out of reviewing an offer to purchase – use the aforementioned tips, and you can decide whether rejecting a homebuying proposal is the best option.


If you receive an offer to purchase your home, you may have only a limited amount of time to decide whether to accept this proposal. As such, there are several factors you'll want to consider to determine whether to approve an offer to purchase your home. These factors include:

1. The Price of Your Home

If you established a competitive initial asking price for your home, you should have no trouble determining whether an offer to purchase falls in line with your expectations. Thus, if an offer to purchase your home is at or above your residence's initial asking price, you may want to accept a buyer's proposal and move forward with a house sale.

Of course, if an offer to purchase your house falls below your residence's initial asking price, you should still evaluate the proposal closely. If you feel the offer to purchase is the best proposal you might receive, you may want to accept it.

2. The Current State of the Local Housing Market

Examine the current state of the local housing market – you'll be glad you did. If you discover you are operating in a buyer's or seller's market, you can assess an offer to purchase your home accordingly.

If you find a buyer's market is in place, you may be more inclined than ever before to accept a competitive offer to purchase your home. Because in this market, the number of sellers exceeds the number of buyers, and rejecting a homebuying proposal does not guarantee you will receive better offers to purchase in the near future.

Comparatively, if a seller's market is in place, you may want to take a wait-and-see approach to any offers to purchase your residence. In this market, the number of buyers exceeds the number of quality houses available. As a result, you may receive dozens of offers to acquire your residence if you wait for the local housing market to develop.

3. Your Home Selling Goals

You should feel good about accepting an offer to purchase your house. Therefore, if an offer to purchase enables you to achieve your home selling goals, you may want to accept it sooner rather than later. By doing so, you can take the next step to finalize your house sale.

As you debate how to proceed with an offer to purchase your house, you may want to consult with a real estate agent too. This housing market professional may be able to offer housing market insights that you won't find anywhere else. Plus, he or she can provide honest, unbiased home selling recommendations. And if you ultimately decide to accept an offer to purchase your residence, a real estate agent can guide you along the final stages of the property selling journey.

There is no reason to settle for a subpar offer to purchase your house. But if you consider the aforementioned factors, you can make an informed decision about whether to accept, reject or counter a homebuying proposal.


You recently listed your home on the real estate market, and now, you've received your first offer. However, you only have a short period of time to review the proposal and accept, reject or counter it. Determining how to handle an offer on your home can be challenging. Fortunately, we're happy to help you fully evaluate an offer so you can make an informed decision. There are numerous factors to consider as you review an offer on your house, including: 1. Price In some cases, homebuyers may submit a "lowball" offer in the hopes of getting a seller to jump at a quick sale. If a home seller accepts this offer, a homebuyer is able to purchase a terrific home at a bargain price. Conversely, if a home seller rejects or counters the offer, a homebuyer may have an opportunity to reconsider his or her options. As a home seller, you should consider how much you are willing to accept for your residence before you add it to the real estate market. By doing so, you can list your home for a fair price and act quickly and effectively as you receive offers. Also, flexibility is paramount for home sellers. And even though you may list your home for a particular price, you may want to consider accepting an offer below your initial asking price if you're looking for a quick sale. 2. Sale of a Buyer's Home Although a homebuyer may submit an offer that is at or above your initial asking price, the proposal may have strings attached that could slow down the home selling process. For instance, a homebuyer could make an offer that is contingent upon him or her selling a residence within a set period of time. But if this homebuyer is unable to sell his or her house, your home sale could fall through, which could cost you both time and money. In this scenario, consider your options carefully. If you believe you can receive other offers from homebuyers who don't require this contingency, you may be better off rejecting or countering the proposal. 3. Your Timeline If you've already secured a new home and need to sell your current residence as quickly as possible, you may want to consider accepting an offer even if it is below your initial asking price. On the other hand, if you are able to afford two mortgages for an extended period of time, you may be better equipped to wait out a slow real estate market. When it comes to determining whether to accept an offer on your residence, consulting with your real estate agent usually is a great idea. This professional can offer expert resources you might struggle to find elsewhere and empower you with the insights you need to make the best decision possible. Consider the aforementioned factors as you evaluate an offer on your home, and you should be able to accept, reject or counter a proposal with confidence.

You may have the notion as you’re searching for a house that the first bid will win when it comes to jumping at the chance to buy a home. That’s not always true. however, can waiting too long to put in an offer on a home be detrimental to your home search? We’ll go over some of the best advice as to what makes a good offer, and when the best time to put that offer in is.  


There’s actually no real set timeline for when you should put an offer in on a home. The real determination of this is the type of housing market that we’re in in at any particular time. A fast moving housing market can equate to the need for you to make an offer quickly. Most realtors will agree that you shouldn't wait too long to put in an offer on a home that you like. 


If you have a good realtor, and you have done your homework as well, you’ll be able to make an educated offer. You’ll have done your due diligence if you have a pre-approval letter ready and understand a bit about the market itself, along with the pricing typical of the neighborhood where you’re interested in buying. Your realtor can help you to understand as to whether the offer you want to put in is a good one or not. 


Know What You Want


The most important part of putting in an offer on a home is knowing what you want in a  home. Before you get to the point where you actually want to put in offers, it’s a good idea to have searched a bit online, and even attended a few open houses in the area where you’re searching. This will give you a better idea of what’s out there in your price range.     


The First Offer Is The Best One


This is an old adage in the real estate business. If you’re a seller, you have to assume that what a buyer is offering is their top number. If other offers come in at a higher price, then buyers who were really interested in the home may be fresh out of luck. That’s why putting in a strong offer is so important. You don’t want to lose out on a home that you really want because you haven’t taken the time to understand what a good price point for a home in your neighborhood of choice is.


New Listings Have More Interest


Homes that have just been listed generate the most enthusiasm. Sometimes, the biggest part of putting an offer in on a home is trial and error. Many people will put in 2 to 3 offers before they finally secure the home of their dreams. Newer listings typically expect more for the price point the house is listed at. If a home has been listed for a short time, buyers can expect to pay close to the asking price for the home. Homes that have been on the market for a longer period of time have more negotiating power, giving the buyer a bit more wiggle room in their offer.  

The bottom line is that if you see a home that you love, you’ll want to put an offer in as soon as possible. When the market is hot, no home will last long. Be prepared to make an offer when you find that property you want so that the process will be a lot easier for you.  





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